NELSON Robert

Pressure on the Poetic: the politics of the next reverie in the studio

Abstract:

Aspects of the poetic are discussed in relation to defining knowledge. Like humour—which cannot easily be explained and defies the organizational rigour of research—the poetic is a paradox in research. It is central to most art practice but inaccessible to systematic analysis. But also like humour, it can be highly contested. Esteem for the poetic can be frowned upon. Recognizing it or apologizing for it was often a stigma in art history. Since the 1970s there has been a certain aesthetic shyness, the terms of which are debated in this paper. Elements of the poetic are outlined on a psychological plane, in its metaphoric agency and through imagination. Definitions are attempted in the cross-discursive, relating to medium-consciousness and congruence of form and content.Aspects of the poetic are discussed in relation to defining knowledge. Like humour—which cannot easily be explained and defies the organizational rigour of research—the poetic is a paradox in research. It is central to most art practice but inaccessible to systematic analysis. But also like humour, it can be highly contested. Esteem for the poetic can be frowned upon. Recognizing it or apologizing for it was often a stigma in art history. Since the 1970s there has been a certain aesthetic shyness, the terms of which are debated in this paper. Elements of the poetic are outlined on a psychological plane, in its metaphoric agency and through imagination. Definitions are attempted in the cross-discursive, relating to medium-consciousness and congruence of form and content.

Download Pressure on the Poetic: the politics of the next reverie in the studio (94.07 KB)

NELSON Robert:

Dr Robert Nelson is the Associate Dean Research and Graduate Studies and Associate Professor and in the Faculty of Art & Design at Monash University, where he teaches research methods in the studio graduate program. He gained his MA (French and Italian painting and literature) and PhD (Greek sculpture and philology) from La Trobe University. His publications have mostly centred on contemporary Australian art, with 100 essays in journals and catalogues and 400 newspaper articles as art critic for The Age in Melbourne. In 2000, Robert was awarded the Pascall Prize (a national prize for critical writing in all fields of the arts). Robert is also a painter, with 11 solo exhibitions and 10 group or collaborative exhibitions and scene painting for Polixeni Papapetrou.